Catherine Young

Class of 2012

Contact

Catherine is a writer who loves both art and science. She received her bachelor’s degree in molecular biology and biotechnology from the Philippines, and fine art education in Spain. She lived in Manhattan for three years doing graduate work in cancer and neuroscience, and studying illustration in the Art Students League of New York. Previous experience includes communications, design, journalism and editorial work for a national broadsheet, a global human rights organization, an art magazine, and a collaborative video game installation project. Her work uses science, poetry, prose, visual and performance art as means of investigation to create narratives.

According to her DNA test, she is a happy mix of a lot of things. She loves taekwondo and yoga, and speaks five languages. She considers Manila, New York, and Barcelona as home in many ways.

This is her eighth incarnation.

Projects

Prototyping User Experiences

To wrap up our class, Prototyping User Experiences, we were tasked to answer why prototyping was important in the design process and to give tips to the next batch of SVA MFA Interaction Design students who will be taking the same class next year. Samples of projects, such as production sketches for CabReel, and the Glo-Machine, a bioluminescence encyclopedia that utilizes RFID, Flash, Funnel, and clay were included.

Kudos to our instructors: Jeff Hoefs, Josh Musick, Clay Wiedemann, and Robert Fabricant. Also to: the lab of Dr. AnnMarie Thomas at the University of St. Thomas for the protocol on squishy circuits, and Shawn and Yoshimi of Lullatone for the music.

{header}

DrawHappy: A Global Art Project on Drawing Your Happiness

For years, I have been fascinated with happiness—its arbitrariness as well as our insistence on quantifying it. This investigation led me to Iceland, one of the happiest places in the world.

In asking people what made them happy, I realized that one of the most universal and clearest ways to record their responses was to ask them to draw what made them happy. Drawing is one of the earliest skills we learn; its basic elements are comprehensible to people of all ages, cultures and nations. I reasoned that if people knew that they were happy, they should be able to identify the source and moreover, visually embody this joy. I decided to visualize the results of this ongoing art and social experiment, and to attempt to plot their responses on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a way to qualify these instead of putting them on a metric.

Learn more or follow @idrawhappy for more details.

{header}

Shadow.Me is an interactive installation that allows visitors to share their secrets anonymously and to view the secrets shared by others.

{header}

Shadow.Me is an interactive installation that allows visitors to share their secrets anonymously and to view the secrets shared by others.

{header}

Shadow.Me is an interactive installation that allows visitors to share their secrets anonymously and to view the secrets shared by others.

Shadow.me

Shadow.Me is an interactive installation that allows visitors to share their secrets anonymously and to view the secrets shared by others.

These secrets are visually embodied in the shadows of the contributors, which are scanned in a pod that is part of the installation. To share a secret, the user walks into the pod, enters his age, gender and geographic origin, and whispers his secret into the “ear” of the pod. After his shadow is scanned by sensors, he can then leave the pod. His shadow will appear on either wall of the installation after a twenty-minute delay to hide the visitor’s identity. The text of the secret will appear on the shadow’s body, and the audio track of the visitor whispering his secret will be heard over the speakers to join those of others.

{header}

Rorsketch is a public collaborative art project that allows MoMA PS1 visitors to draw their interpretations of clouds on a digital interface on the rooftop.

Catherine Young

Rorsketch

Rorsketch is a public collaborative art project that allows MoMA PS1 visitors to draw their interpretations of clouds on a digital interface on the rooftop. Using data gathered from visitors’ smartphones, the drawings will be automatically tagged with the sketcher’s name, age, profession, and country of origin. People can view the most recent interpretations in the courtyard. A gallery of these drawings with their metadata will be displayed in the two adjacent alcoves. These drawings will be documented online.

Learn more.

{header}

Smorgasbus is food truck and education program that seeks to put a dent in the rising childhood obesity epidemic.

Smorgasbus

Smorgasbus is food truck and education program that seeks to put a dent in the rising childhood obesity epidemic. On one side Smorgasbus is an alternative school lunch service that delivers a variety of healthy, kid-delicious meals along with quality nutrition education to school children, grades 3rd-5th, in the areas that need it most like Harlem, the Bronx and central Brooklyn. On the other side Smorgasbus is a lunch option for the millions of working adults in the metro NYC area. Profits from working adults sales fund the meals, education and events for children in low-income areas and food deserts.

{header}

A series of objects and experiences that each engage one or a combination of the five senses to promote wonder and creativity.

{header}

The Perceptionalist

To demonstrate how the senses can be both bridge between memory and creativity and a catalyst to the creative process, The Perceptionalist is a series of projects that engaged one or a combination of the senses.

  • Sight: Rorsketch is an interactive project that allows participants to draw what they see in clouds.
  • Smell: Smellbound is a service that allows participants to create a digital olfactory timeline and to publish their own book of smells that contains microencapsulated odors printed on paper that correspond to a specific memory.
  • Touch: The Hug Vest and HugPrints allow participants to make hugging more fun by wearing a vest that had visual feedback.
  • Hearing and Taste: EatPoetry is a literary dining event that pairs poetry with food.

While these projects can occur separately, they can also co-exist in the form of a "sense kit" which contains all these concepts in a physical, non-digital format. They have been demonstrated in specific real-world scenarios, such as the Intrepid Museum and a TEDx conference.