Portfolio Guidelines For Submitting your Best Work

Admission to the program requires a portfolio. The clarity of your portfolio is a critical part of presenting your work, no matter what your background. 


What kind of projects should I include?

Because this is an interaction design portfolio doesn’t mean that it should only include interaction design work. Demonstrating that you have a design range that spans multiple disciplines, and that you have fluency across multiple media demonstrates that you have a holistic approach that will be not only valuable to other students and to the program. 

For inspiration purposes only, the following are examples of project types you may include in your portfolio; this is not a list of requirements:

  • Design work that demonstrates visual literacy, craft, process, and the corresponding product/service.
  • Usability and social science research that emphasizes the concept and ultimate findings.
  • Strategy and writing projects that communicate audience, challenge, and outcomes.
  • Coding projects that show samples, process, and outcome.
  • Project management accomplishments that make clear the responsibilities, challenge, and problem solved.

What are the requirements for a portfolio?

We look for five characteristics: concept, craft, communication, process, and empathy. When considering each piece you include, consider how each might contribute to your story across these five criteria.

  • You must submit your portfolio as a URL or link to a PDF. No physical portfolios will be accepted.
  • You should include at least five projects. These projects can be a range of work from design to code to writing to filmmaking to music. While we suggest that you consider including at least five pieces in your portfolio, you should use that as a guideline. You should only include pieces that you are proud of.
  • You are strongly encouraged to submit one case study. The case study should describe one of your projects from concept through completion. Emphasize your process and thinking in a concise case study.
  • Your portfolio should be easy to use. Consider your audience — the portfolio committee. You are the curator. If you were designing a space, you’d consider whether you’d like us to turn left or right through the gallery. Make the same considerations with your portfolio and the experience of your portfolio committee.
  • Don’t be afraid to show details. We’re equally interested in reviewing a final product as we are the concepts and sketches that comprised the process. Consider including process sketches as portfolio pieces in their own right as they contribute to a visual story of your personal design process.

Loading results…